Chemistry

Oobleck

Author(s): SEP Coordinators

Oobleck

Students will read the first part of the book by Dr. Seuss, "Bartholomew and the Oobleck," where they learn about the mysterious substance "Oobleck",  created by a group of magicians in the story. Students then make Oobleck from cornstarch and water and observe its properties, realizing that Oobleck does not behave like other solids or liquids.  After experiencing Oobleck first hand, students create their own ending to "Bartholomew and the Oobleck".

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Exploring chemical bonding

Author(s): SEP staff

Exploring chemical bonding

Students will engage in an exploration demonstrating the Octet rule and chemical bonding using paper models of elements forming covalent and ionic compounds.

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Cleaning Water: A 5th Grade Standards-Based Science Unit

Author(s): (Coach) David Mann, (Team Members) Kevin Baldizon, Jeff Foote, Robin Schneider, Ben Wieman

Cleaning Water: A 5th Grade Standards-Based Science Unit

Many children around the world die due to drinking contaminated water.  This engaging science lesson will allow students learn how to build and use a simple homemade filter system to clean contaminated water. This 5th grade, standards-based lesson is great for California Science Content Standards Earth Sciences.  Students make observations, collect data and form hypothesis.  The end result is a gratifying surprise that they will enjoy while learning basic investigation and experimentation concepts.

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What factors affect the oxidation of apples?

Author(s): John Rivera, Lillian Seu, Juliet Rose Girard, Anthony Shiver

What factors affect the oxidation of apples?

Students observe the browning of apples after cut and being exposed to air and brainstorm ideas about why this might be happening.
Students think about ways to slow down or prevent the browning effect and in teams create and conduct a simple experiment to test their ideas.

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How does the pH environment affect bioavailability of Iron?

Author(s): John C. Rivera, Lillian Seu, Juliet Rose Girard, Anthony Shiver

How does the pH environment affect bioavailability of Iron?

Dietary minerals are available through ingestion of food and supplements.  In this lesson, students first examine the chemical reaction of two forms of iron, Fe0 and F+2 with various pH conditions of either the stomach or intestine to determine how it gets absorbed and eliminated in the body. Then students isolate iron from the foods we eat (such as cereal) using a magnet to attract elemental iron or Fe0.

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Forensics Crime Lab

Author(s): Molly Darragh, Maria Jenerik, Sarah Maifeld, Christopher McClendon

Forensics Crime Lab

A crime is staged in the classroom.  After observing the crime scene, student identify and collect crime scene evidence.  Students use blood typing analysis, microscopy, and chromatography to analyze the evidence.  The list of suspects is narrowed to identify the potential culprit. This lesson may be done in two parts or as one long session.

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Testing for Lipids, Proteins and Carbohydrates

Author(s): SEP staff (Chemistry of Life lesson)

Testing for Lipids, Proteins and Carbohydrates

Students will test a variety of food samples for the presence of lipids, proteins, simple and complex carbohydrates.

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Properties of Metals

Author(s): Philip Merksamer, Beatrice Wang, Sue Mocklin, Sarah Simson

Properties of Metals

Students will be able to see the iron filings in breakfast cereal fortified with iron and qualitatively compare the iron content between 2 different cereals.   They will also see that as part of a salt solution, some elements give off characteristic colors when placed in a flame.

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What is matter?

Author(s): SEP staff

What is matter?

This activity is based on a lesson from the Living by Chemistry curriculum developed by the Lawrence Hall of Science (see citation).

During this activity students explore in depth their own understanding of what constitutes "matter" and work together as a group to create a definition for matter.

Students work in pairs to debate how to sort "items" printed on cards into three categories: "matter", "non-matter" and "unsure" and then try to determine what properties all items in each category have in common. A whole class discussion about "tricky" items follows during which students ultimately agree on a definition of matter.

You can choose which cards you would like to use depending on your students' age, abilities, and experiences.  As an example, for elementary grades, you might choose not to use the entire set.

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States of Matter (lesson five of eight)

Author(s): Ben Engel, Arthur Millius, Lisa Monti and Helen Wong-Lew

States of Matter (lesson five of eight)

Students investigate the difference between ice and dry ice, and review the concept of control and variable. The scientists demonstrate condensation, sublimation, and freezing with a series of object lessons.

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