STAT (K-5)

Scientist-Teacher Action Teams (STAT) bring together UCSF volunteers and teachers in San Francisco public schools to teach a series of investigative science lessons around biological, physical, and/or earth science topics in kindergarten through 5th grade classrooms.

Which Soil Do Plants Like Best? - Part 2, Collecting Data

Author(s): Will Ludington, Evelyn Hernandez, Karla Perez, Katherine Sorber

Which Soil Do Plants Like Best? - Part 2, Collecting Data

Students will explore how plants grow while using the scientific method to conduct an experiment.

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Which Soil Do Plants Like Best? - Part 1, Planting

Author(s): Will Ludington, Evelyn Hernandez, Karla Perez, Katherine Sorber

Which Soil Do Plants Like Best? - Part 1, Planting

Students will explore how plants grow while using the scientific method to conduct an experiment.

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Polarity of Magnets

Author(s): Paige Nittler, Adrian Guggisberg, Jenny Chaffo, Malaika Sapper, SEP staff

Polarity of Magnets

Students will investigate how the effects of magnets change when their position in space is changed. Children are introduced to basic concepts of orientation in space.

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Cleaning Water: A 5th Grade Standards-Based Science Unit

Author(s): (Coach) David Mann, (Team Members) Kevin Baldizon, Jeff Foote, Robin Schneider, Ben Wieman

Cleaning Water: A 5th Grade Standards-Based Science Unit

Many children around the world die due to drinking contaminated water.  This engaging science lesson will allow students learn how to build and use a simple homemade filter system to clean contaminated water. This 5th grade, standards-based lesson is great for California Science Content Standards Earth Sciences.  Students make observations, collect data and form hypothesis.  The end result is a gratifying surprise that they will enjoy while learning basic investigation and experimentation concepts.

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What factors affect the oxidation of apples?

Author(s): John Rivera, Lillian Seu, Juliet Rose Girard, Anthony Shiver

What factors affect the oxidation of apples?

Students observe the browning of apples after cut and being exposed to air and brainstorm ideas about why this might be happening.
Students think about ways to slow down or prevent the browning effect and in teams create and conduct a simple experiment to test their ideas.

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Forensics Crime Lab

Author(s): Molly Darragh, Maria Jenerik, Sarah Maifeld, Christopher McClendon

Forensics Crime Lab

A crime is staged in the classroom.  After observing the crime scene, student identify and collect crime scene evidence.  Students use blood typing analysis, microscopy, and chromatography to analyze the evidence.  The list of suspects is narrowed to identify the potential culprit. This lesson may be done in two parts or as one long session.

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What Do Living Things Have In Common?

Author(s): Linda Akiyama (adapted from SEP lesson)

What Do Living Things Have In Common?

Students work in teams to discuss the question "What do all living things have in common?" They record their ideas and share their background knowledge. Then the groups come together and try to reach consensus about the characteristics that all living things share by asking each other questions and defending their ideas.

This is the first lesson from the unit, "What is a Living Thing, and How Does a Living Thing Respond to Its Environment?" The unit is designed to supplement the adopted FOSS curriculum on life sciences. In this unit students are given time to think about and discuss the fundamental question, "What is a Living Thing?" They are also introduced to a process for planning science investigations on the topic of how different living things interact with their environment. The unit ends with students deciding on a testable question, designing an investigation, doing the investigation, collecting data and drawing conclusions. Students then create poster presentations of  their investigation for a grade level science fair.

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Skulls- Herbivores, Omnivores, and Carnivores

Author(s): Jen

Skulls- Herbivores, Omnivores, and Carnivores

Students familiarize themselves with different types of animal skulls and teeth.  From observation they learn to tell which skulls are those of herbivores, omnivores and carnivores.

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Ocean Pollution & its effect on aquatic animals

Author(s): Mary Matyskiela, Lani Keller

Ocean Pollution & its effect on aquatic animals

Students brainstorm different sources of pollution.  Then, students make their own miniature ocean inside a water bottle, and pollute it with waste and oil to observe the effects on animals in the water.  A demonstration shows students the effect of oil on birds' feathers and discuss the consequences of oil spills for water birds.

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Measuring Calories in Food

Author(s): Luna Abdallah, Elinor Sullivan, Bethany Currin, Mathew Campana

Measuring Calories in Food

The lesson introduces the concept of calories and provides examples of high calorie and low calorie foods. Students learn a number of ways to determine how many calories a food item has and discuss how calories influence body weight. Students learn how to measure calories by constructing and using a calorimeter.

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